Myanmar was third in the world for vulnerability to climate change in 1997-2016. The Myanmar Climate Change Alliance (MCCA) was central to the formulation of the Myanmar Climate Change Strategy. 
 

myanmarLabutta, in the heart of the Irrawaddy Delta, is one of the villages where residents were battered by Cyclone Nargis 10 years ago, in the worst natural disaster in the history of Myanmar. 
Nargis was a devastating category- four cyclone that swept across the Bay of Bengal creating storm surges that ruined fields and crops and destroyed thousands of homes. In total, 2.4 million people were displaced and more than 138 000 people died. The Climate Risk Index (CRI), a vulnerability-ranking global tool to assess which country suffers most from extreme weather events, Myanmar was third in the world for 1997-2016, after Honduras and Haiti. 

The Myanmar Climate Change Alliance (MCCA), supported by the GCCA+, has funded the construction of multi-purpose cyclone shelters, as well as adaptation planning for the Irrawaddy Delta area, in consultation with communities and local government authorities. The MCCA was also central to developing Myanmar’s Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC). 

Alongside conceiving the Myanmar Climate Change Strategy and Master Plan (MCCSMP), the MCCA supported the drafting of Myanmar’s INDC with technical support that helped to get the document ready in time to submit it to the UNFCCC. 

The MCCA chose to set up a technical working group (TWG) as a multi-sectoral coordination mechanism to help guide the drawing up of the MCCSMP, one of the programme’s key deliverables. The Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation saw the value and recognised the success of such a consultative approach. 

The TWG participated in sectoral and plenary meetings, ensuring that the MCCSMP was included as part of the INDC in terms of institutional arrangements and planning for implementation. 

Links: 
Video Documentary - Warmer days: Myanmar in the Age of Climate Change
Story - Labutta: now we realize the importance of mangroves
Story - Pakokku: climate change can be spookily quiet